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What Clients Should Know When Preparing for a Deposition

A deposition is a question-and-answer session with the parties to the lawsuit and the other side’s attorney. Typically, a lawyer will ask the same or similar questions of a witness during the deposition as he or she will ask during the trial of the case. The purpose is to determine what type of witness the person would be if the matter were to proceed to trial. In doing this, lawyers are looking at the credibility of a witness if his or her story differs between the deposition and trial.

Deposition preparation and evaluation of the deponent is critically important in cases. In order to adequately obtain information that is being solicited from the witness, an attorney always must prepare for the deponent. In a deposition, lawyers meet with parties in a case, as well as experts and other witnesses, to ask questions before trial and take statements under oath. This formal questioning is part of the discovery phase, which lawyers use to gather facts to prepare their cases. While depositions are a routine part of litigation, understanding their purpose and how to prepare for them is crucial.

Additionally, lawyers use depositions to determine the strength of their case. Depositions are one of the few times that an attorney gets to evaluate witnesses and use that assessment to determine whether settlement of the case is an option, or if the matter should continue through other motions and trial proceedings. 

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Considerations for Whether, When and How Much to Pay to Settle Litigation

Most lawsuits never go to trial, but it is still difficult for a business that is the target of litigation to know whether and when to settle, and for how much. 

It may be especially challenging for a defendant to take the initiative to settle when it feels it occupies the moral or legal high ground. However, while it may not seem fair, every defendant starts losing money the day the complaint is filed. Unless a defendant has a viable counter claim or a contractual agreement that the loser pays the winner’s fees and costs, the best a defendant can hope for is to lose only the cost of defense. For this and other reasons, it is often the best business decision to settle, even when in the right. But how much should a defendant pay to settle and at what point in the litigation, and at what number is it better to try the case? 

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