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Blog Posts Tagged "department of labor"

New Overtime Rule: What You Need to Know

Come December, 67,000 South Carolina workers will be newly eligible for overtime pay, following a revision of federal rules governing when overtime must be paid. Employers must take steps now to prepare for this rule, which goes into effect December 1, 2016 and will impact employees’ job duties, payroll expenses, and how work is assigned.

Depending on your point of view, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) regulatory change is either a severe burden for businesses – especially small businesses that may have less flexibility in how work is assigned – or a long overdue revision to allow lower-paid salaried workers to catch up to the rest of the economy.

Nationwide, the DOL estimates that about 4.2 million workers could benefit from the rule. In South Carolina, it will affect approximately 30 percent of salaried workers.

Announced May 18, the change addresses the overtime pay rule that is part of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). When Congress passed the FLSA at the tail end of the Great Depression, it mandated that workers had to be paid overtime at a rate of time-and-a-half for all hours over 40 worked in a given week. Exceptions were carved into the law, including exemptions for employees who worked in executive, administrative, outside sales, or professional jobs. (The logic behind these exemptions is that with this level of responsibility comes an obligation to get your work done, regardless of the clock.)

However, in addition to proscribing a baseline for the duties these employees engaged in on a day-to-day basis, Congress said employers could exempt only those employees who were paid a minimum salary. Since 2004, the minimum salary for each of these exemptions has been $455 per week, or $23,660 per year. In addition, employees compensated over $100,000 per year (and paid a weekly salary of at least $455 per week) could be exempt regardless of their job duties.

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