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Blog Posts Tagged "litigation"

Noncompete Agreements in South Carolina: A Primer for Businesses

U.S. businesses covered nearly one in five employees with some form of noncompete agreement intended to prevent them from taking a job with a rival, according to research.

Recent press, including a feature in The New York Times, has placed a sharper focus on the impact that such agreements can have on the nation’s workforce and overall economy. Several states have cracked down on the use of these contracts, and in late 2016, the Obama administration recommended reform.

South Carolina law favors free enterprise and competition and generally disapproves of noncompete agreements. But such agreements can be valid if they are properly limited to strike an appropriate balance between protecting an employer’s interest in protecting trade secrets and investment in training employees with a worker’s right to make a living. 

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Considerations for Whether, When and How Much to Pay to Settle Litigation

Most lawsuits never go to trial, but it is still difficult for a business that is the target of litigation to know whether and when to settle, and for how much. 

It may be especially challenging for a defendant to take the initiative to settle when it feels it occupies the moral or legal high ground. However, while it may not seem fair, every defendant starts losing money the day the complaint is filed. Unless a defendant has a viable counter claim or a contractual agreement that the loser pays the winner’s fees and costs, the best a defendant can hope for is to lose only the cost of defense. For this and other reasons, it is often the best business decision to settle, even when in the right. But how much should a defendant pay to settle and at what point in the litigation, and at what number is it better to try the case? 

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Be Careful What You Sign: Red Flags in Commercial Contracts

When businesses sign a contract, they’re usually focused on the opportunity it represents – a new customer, a better supplier or a partnership that expands their reach. Unfortunately, when we, as lawyers, see some of these same contracts, it’s after the air has gone out of such expectations and a deal has soured. 

While our best advice is to have every contract reviewed by your attorney, we realize that most businesses aren’t going to do that for every agreement. If there is a lot of money – or risk – involved, consider asking your attorney to review a contract – a process that usually isn’t time consuming for legal counsel familiar with your business. 

However, in those cases where you choose not to make a call to your attorney, here are some things to watch for based on our experience. 

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Don’t Automatically Include Arbitration Clauses in Commercial Contracts

For years, mandatory arbitration clauses have been almost automatically included in many commercial contracts, because they’ve been regarded as cost-effective detours for matters that might otherwise work their way through the courts. Over the last few years, we’ve adopted a more critical view of arbitration, and now regard it as a good strategy for some clients, but not for others.

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